Block Heater at Studio Bell & The King Eddy: Friday

The Calgary Folk Music Festival presents:

Block Heater at Studio Bell & The King Eddy: Friday

Fri · February 16, 2018

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

Featuring the following: Windigo, Deicha & The VuDudes, Delhi 2 Dublin, Heavy Bell, Ndidi Onukwulu, Justin Townes Earle, Mister & Mystic, Raleigh, Lab Coast, Kris Demeanor, nêhiyawak, Leeroy Stagger, Ryland Moranz, Kalle Mattson.

Windigo
Windigo
A windigo, by definition, is a spine-chilling monster of the flesh-eating cannibal variety. Whereas the scariest thing about the Calgary version of Windigo is how seamlessly they shapeshift between indie-rock, psychedelia, jazz, funk and grunge. Their live shows have been called “ruthlessly entertaining.” A single Windigo tune can cover a lot of ground: crisp guitar lines that punch staccato holes through liquid soundscapes, anthemic passages that drop away to near-silence and musical left turns where you thought they were going to veer right. Their songs are arranged to make room and leave space for each member’s talents to shine. Windigo is a four-headed colossus, calculated in its determination to leave no stone unturned in the search to satisfy a ravenous appetite for creativity.
Deicha and the Vududes
When Deicha Carter opens her mouth and sings, images of some of the finest, funkiest soul singers and most compelling ‘60s garage rock waft through your psyche and bones. The straight goods are delivered with grit, groove and perfect backing from Nathan Peebles (guitar), Staz Arapov (piano/bass), Anders Czarnecki (drums), Stephen Edward Williams (saxophones) and Abbie Thurgood and Chenelle Roberts on support vocals. Guitar riffs, driving horns and a solid back beat build around powerhouse vocals as this gutsy beast with a doctorate in black magic melts your bits into the hot and sweaty underworld. There are many good reasons Deicha & The VuDudes have become Calgary’s go-to soulful rock outfit. KC/CV
Heavy Bell
Heavy Bell
Canadian writer Elizabeth Smart’s novel By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept, which chronicles a love triangle between the narrator and a married couple, (not unlike Smart’s 18 year affair with British poet George Barker) is considered a poetic prose masterpiece. Smart’s mother, an influential friend of Mackenzie King’s, used her political pull to have the scandalous magnum opus banned in Canada after its publication in 1945 (save for six copies). Heavy Bell is a sweeping, shameless, musical homage to the brilliance of the novel, the endurance of genius and life’s greatest mystery: love. Spearheaded by Royal Canoe’s Matt Peters and actor/singer-songwriter Tom Keenan, Heavy Bell breathes new life into By Grand Central Station passages with an 8-piece chamber ensemble. Thanks to this steadfast Heavy Bell, Smart’s once-suppressed euphoria is ringing out, seven decades later, to the ears of rapturous new audiences.
Ndidi Onukwulu
Ndidi Onukwulu
If you were in attendance on Sunday afternoon of the 2006 Calgary Folk Music Festival, you may have seen a thousand or so music lovers cheering on Ndidi Onukwulu as she broke into African dance during a collaborative workshop. That spontaneous show of joy is Onukwulu, through and through. Born to a Nigerian jazz-musician father and a German mother, Onukwulu’s sense of adventure is innate. From growing up in remote Burns Lake, BC, to immersing herself in the bustling NYC open-mic scene or visiting graveyards for quiet inspiration, Onukwulu comfortably embraces new environments. She holds a deep reverence for all music forms; her distinct voice is a spirituous potion from which blues, rock, jazz, cabaret and soul have been lovingly distilled.
Justin Townes Earle
Justin Townes Earle
Being an heir to musical royalty can be both a blessing and a curse, with a mountain of ancestral legacy to climb. One could well imagine carrying the names of two legends – his father Steve Earle and his hero Townes van Zandt – would make the climb steeper. But since his 2008 debut, the award-winning Justin Townes Earle has been making his own way to the summit of musical achievement at an impressive rate. JTE belongs to a breed of musician somewhat overshadowed in today’s Nashville but is still going strong; an artist and craftsman who builds new and beautiful sounds out of an American roots music tradition whose foundations he respects and understands. Make no mistake, however: JTE’s raw baritone voice and his continually authentic, fresh and unpredictable songwriting are unmistakably his.
Mister & Mystic
Mister & Mystic
Whilst touring and performing with their psychedelic rock band - The Heirlooms, Matthew Spreen and Kat Westerman needed an outlet for their delicate, helpless-love songs. Combining their obsession for lush harmonies and groovy ‘70s inspired rhythms, they penned the heart-struck songs that appear on their first self-titled offering.
Kris Demeanor
Kris Demeanor
Calgary’s first poet laureate, Kris Demeanor, emerged as a striking talent with his solo album in the late ‘90s. From the start, his gift for nailing down truths was obvious. So, too, was his penchant for singing the unspeakable: Gary Glitter’s girl, Saskatoon police “starlight tours” and the horror of designated bike lanes. Demeanor fearlessly experiments with sounds, genres, people and mediums. He’s co-written with Ian Tyson, played Cal Cavendish on stage, and was recently nominated for a Canadian Screen Award as Best Supporting Actor for The Valley Below. So you can understand why there is not enough barbed wire, concrete, and irony to fence this astounding songwriter in.
nêhiyawak
nêhiyawak
Sweeping, like the wind blowing across the northern prairies; grand, like a solemn ceremony — the emotional indie-rock of nêhiyawak is perfectly situated in the place of its origin. It’s modern while retaining roots in music far older than rock ‘n’ roll, and it’s 100 percent home-grown.
Drummer Marek Tyler and guitarist-songwriter Kris Harper are cousins from the Onion Lake Cree Nation on the Alberta-Saskatchewan border north of Lloydminster. Along with bassist Matthew Cardinal, they are veterans of the Edmonton and national indie rock scene; the three have played in Diamond Mind, Meatdraw, Pale Moon Lights, and Kathryn Calder’s band, among others. Now, with nêhiyawak, these young indigenous musicians have created a special alchemy.
nêhiyawak , pronounced neh-HEE-o-wuk, is the Crees’ eponym. Naming your band after your nation is a big, bold move, but nêhiyawak is up to the challenge. By taking a traditional approach to their process — requesting permission to play in other cities or going to a sweat lodge to inform their creative decisions — they’re infusing their modern, urban aesthetic with the deep cultural memories and traditions of their forebearers. As a result, resonating synth tones and edgy guitar riffs sound completely at home with the pulsing, organic sounds of cedar wood noisemakers and hand drums. Tyler sums up their bridgemaking perfectly when he says “This is nêhiyawak — where culture meets chord, melody and rhythm.”
(FF/LS)
Delhi 2 Dublin
Delhi 2 Dublin
Try to keep your feet still while Delhi 2 Dublin taunt you to Turn Up the Stereo - we dare you! D2D is a Vancouver band that has travelled the world doing one thing extremely well: filling the air with high energy, positive-vibe music. Imagine an off-the-chain beach party where a Celtic fiddler jams along to mashups of electronic beats, acoustic instruments, ‘70s Bollywood, hip hop and bhangra - oh wait, that’s pretty much what happened when D2D played at Burning Man in 2016! When singalongs that celebrate landmarks like East Van bust out, D2D audiences are a reflection of the band: culturally diverse but joyously united. Turns out we ARE all Desi!
Raleigh
Raleigh
At times, Raleigh has seemed aggressively playful. Bustling rhythms wobble in and out of striking melodies, flexed between blistering guitar lines and a transcendent cello. It wasn’t until this year when the Calgary indie outfit released the Shawn Everett produced, Powerhouse Bloom that it’s clear how intrepid they could be. Raleigh is casually raucous, constructing intricate grooves and patterns before ripping into them with academic viscera. Conversational lyrics and vocal trade-offs meet sudden and deliberate melodic twists and turns. With members shared between Calgary’s other indie darlings Reuben and the Dark and Dojo Workhorse, Raleigh has become a pocket of experimentation, where guitar freak-outs and meditative strings share the soundscape in arrangements that lean into the persuasively labyrinthine. It’s contemplative and complex, it’s rhythmic and rambunctious.
Lab Coast
Lab Coast
Calgary’s Lab Coast has 4 full-length albums and 1 goal: write effervescent, lo-fi pop nuggets. Formed in 2008 by drummer Chris Dadge and songwriter Chris Laing, Lab Coast also includes Samantha Savage Smith and Darrell Hartsook. Great melodies, catchy hooks and layered jangly guitar parts define Lab Coast’s intensely likeable sound. The songs are deliberately short, catching listeners in mid-headbop until the next song starts up. As brief as they are, their songs still contain semi-orchestral surprises: breathing room, unexpected bridges and winsome harmonies. Laing’s deadpan delivery is surprisingly adorable. This is well-crafted stuff and it’s no wonder that Lab Coast have gained a following that reaches far beyond the comfort of their beloved basement.
Leeroy Stagger
Leeroy Stagger
Stagger’s songs are snapshots of the significant events and people who have impacted his colourful life; time capsules to be opened and unpacked, all the contents marvelously intact. From rocking out in the early days of Victoria’s punk scene to navigating the emotional repercussions following a heart-stopping car accident, the most poignant moments from each experience are gold dust, saved in the sieve of the Leeroy’s astute songwriting. He modestly states: “I just go where the songs take me,” but clearly Stagger has a highly-calibrated musical intuition. His eleventh album, Love Versus, is a private collection of easily relatable personal moments Recorded in his new studio (built from prize money won at 2015 Peak Performance Project), Stagger isn’t afraid to roll up his sleeves, get his hands dirty and put his blue collar work ethic to good use. CV/KC
Ryland Moranz
Ryland Moranz
He’s never killed a man or robbed a bank but unassuming, bowtie-loving, bespectacled Ryland Moranz is certainly, most definitely, a dangerous man. Look out! He’ll pin your ears back and fill them with fast and furious banjo picking, songs about ne’er-do-wells and beautiful worlds and, if you buy him a shot, he might just tell you a few tales of what it’s like to be on the road as one of Leeroy Stagger’s bandmates. Moranz is a multi-instrumentalist-storyteller from a most musical southern Alberta family and he’s not afraid to use the many implements in his arsenal. Guitar, banjo, harmonica, mandolin, accordion, keyboards; whatever it takes to unclasp your locks and sneak those disarming songs and astute insights past your sleepy sentinels, Ryland’s brought it. Careful - this one’s aiming right between your eyes.
Kalle Mattson
Kalle Mattson
27-year-old Mattson has been busy since his 2011 debut, putting out five releases, including the Polaris Music Prize nominated Someday, The Moon Will Be Gold (2014) and the JUNO Award nominated EP Avalanche (2015). His work highlights emotive narratives with grandeur and vulnerability, sung in a sweet falsetto-flirting tenor. Although rooted in the singer-songwriter world, he has evolved into a veritable pop wunderkind, wielding pristine synths as masterfully as he does acoustic shimmer. His new single “Broken In Two” – the single for his just-released coming-of-age album about the in-between days of post-adolescence and pre-adulthood – includes haunting keyboards and drum machines.
Venue Information:
Studio Bell & The King Eddy
850 4 Street SE.
Calgary, AB, T2G 0L8